Master Hasumi's 2013 USA Visit

Shudokan Karate was honored to host Master Hasumi, who visited from Japan and gave a seminar to karate practitioners from around the metro Denver area. It was the third year that Master Hasumi has visited.

He led Sensei Tanabe's regular advanced class for 2 hours, then led a 4 hour seminar on Saturday, October 19, at the Elk's Lodge in Longmont, Colorado.

Master Hasumi was one of Sensei Tanabe's original teachers. At 80 years old, he is one of the few 9th degree black belts in the world. He was also Vice-President of the Japan Karate-do Federation and General Secretary of the World Karate-do Federation for 17 years.

Master Hasumi taught us many techniques, which Sensei Tanabe will continue to teach in the coming year. One of the highlights was teaching the application of two katas, Pinan Yodan and Pinan Sandan.

Master Hasumi demonstrates a blocking techniqueMaster Hasumi demonstrates a blocking technique

 

Master Hasumi works with Gabe RambergMaster Hasumi works with Gabe Ramberg

 

Master Hasumi throws GabeMaster Hasumi throws Gabe

 

Master Hasumi throws Gabe againMaster Hasumi throws Gabe again

 

 

 

 

Master Hasumi and Sensei TanabeMaster Hasumi and Sensei Tanabe

 

Master Hasumi explains the application of Pinan YodanMaster Hasumi explains the application of Pinan Yodan

 

 

 

The class listens while Sensei Tanabe translates for Master HasumiThe class listens while Sensei Tanabe translates for Master Hasumi

 

The class practices an application of Pinan YodanThe class practices an application of Pinan Yodan

 

Students demonstrate their technique while the class watchesStudents demonstrate their technique while the class watches

 

Students demonstrate their technique while the class watchesStudents demonstrate their technique while the class watches

 

The class practices Pinan Yodan with a new understandingThe class practices Pinan Yodan with a new understanding

 

End of classEnd of class

 

Master Hasumi, Sensei Tanabe, and Advanced Class StudentsMaster Hasumi, Sensei Tanabe, and Advanced Class Students

Master Hasumi's 2012 USA Visit

Once again, Shudokan Karate was honored to host Master Hasumi, who visited from Japan and gave a seminar to over 60 karate practitioners from around the metro Denver area.

The seminar took place at the Elk's Lodge in Longmont, Colorado. It was the second year that Master Hasumi has visited. (You can see photos from last year's visit here.)

Master Hasumi was one of Sensei Tanabe's original teachers. At 79 years old, he is one of the few 9th degree black belts in the world. He was also Vice-President of the Japan Karate-do Federation and General Secretary of the World Karate-do Federation for 17 years.


Master Hasumi Seminar Photos

Shudokan Karate was recently honored to host Master Hasumi, who was visiting from Japan and gave a 3-hour seminar to over 30 karate practitioners from around the metro Denver area. 

Master Hasumi was one of Sensei Tanabe's original teachers. At 78 years old, he is one of the few 9th degree black belts in the world. He was also Vice-President of the Japan Karate-do Federation and General Secretary of the World Karate-do Federation for 17 years. Sensei Kurobane, as well as a number of his students, also joined us for this fun and educational event with a true master!

Master Hasumi explains the principles of kumite

 

Master Hasumi supervises an exercise

 

Master Hasumi and Students

 

Sensei Kurobane, Master Hasumi, and Sensei Tanabe

Japan Disaster Relief

Dear Friends,

As all of you know, an unprecedented earthquake and tsunami recently devastated a large area of the Tohoku region of Japan. Over 15,000 people died or are missing, and over 100,000 houses were washed away. There are over 300,000 people displaced and living in temporary shelters; many of them lost everything, yet relief supplies are slow to arrive. In addition, the tsunami-damaged nuclear reactors in Fukushima prefecture are causing enormous problems in the area and hindering the relief efforts.

As a native of Japan, the scenes of the tsunami were horrifying and unbearable to watch. The relentless, raging torrent swallowed everything in its path, tossing the cars, houses and large ships like twigs. It even completely overwhelmed three-story buildings. It left eerie, ghostly mountains of destruction and despair.

However, I have also been encouraged by the acts of kindness shown in our community during this difficult time. For example, the students at Front Range Community College set up tables to sell homemade cookies and cupcakes, raising money for a relief fund to help the people affected by this disaster. If I were to find something positive in this calamity, it would definitely be in our innate human nature of humanitarianism and sympathy.    

In an effort to help the people left in this terrible predicament, I would like to ask the people of Longmont to make a donation to the American Red Cross or any other trusted disaster relief organization. Your kindness will be greatly appreciated by the people of Japan.

Sincerely,
Hiroyuki Tanabe

Shudokan Students head to Wado-Kai World Cup

Local Karate Students Head to World Cup - Longmont Times-Call, 7/31/2010

By Magdalena Wegrzyn
© 2010 Longmont Times-Call

Gus Brockmann — training at Wado-Kai Shudokan Karate, 325 Main St., in Longmont — is one of 10 who will represent the United States in the Wado-Kai World Cup in Nagoya, Japan. Photo by Joshua Buck, Longmont Times-CallGus Brockmann — training at Wado-Kai Shudokan Karate, 325 Main St., in Longmont — is one of 10 who will represent the United States in the Wado-Kai World Cup in Nagoya, Japan. Photo by Joshua Buck, Longmont Times-CallLONGMONT — At karate practice, Gus Brockmann maintains steely concentration, slicing through martial arts moves with razor precision.

But despite his focus, the 33-year-old Longmont resident has humble goals for his international debut in a few weeks.

"I’d like to win a couple fights, but more so I can get the experience of fighting a couple times," he said.

Brockmann is one of four karate students from Longmont’s Wado-Kai Shudokan Karate who will compete in the Wado-Kai World Cup in Nagoya, Japan. Athletes from 49 countries are scheduled to compete Aug. 14-15 at the World Cup, according to the tournament website.

Brockmann and Westminster resident Gabe Ramberg, 29 — who also trains at the Longmont studio — earned spots on the seven-member U.S. team during the national trials this April in Denver. The U.S. team includes two members from Denver studios and three from Arizona.

Each studio that offers wado karate — a style that stresses harmony and fluid, natural movements — also can send two high school-age representatives to the World Cup. Sensei Hiroyuki Tanabe, 56, who opened Wado-Kai Shudokan Karate in 1988, chose Rachel Van Court, 17, and Jesse Mooney, 14, to represent Longmont internationally.

"I hope they have a good experience, meet people from other cultures and enjoy themselves," said Tanabe, who is from Chiba, Japan.

At the World Cup, judges evaluate athletes on sparring and a series of martial arts movements called kata. There are many kata routines, all based on ancient traditions.

Van Court, who will be a senior at Niwot High School, said she’s trying not to let her nerves ruin the kushanku kata routine she has perfected.

"I would like to not completely disgrace the dojo," she said. "Basically, I want to do well and not totally mess everything up."

While Van Court said she is looking forward to the kata, Mooney said he’s ready to spar.

The Niwot High School freshman said he’s usually nervous days before a fight, but on competition day, he’s ready.

"My dad says sparring is what separates the pretty guys from the good guys," said Mooney, who also wrestles.

Ramberg competed in the 2005 World Cup and made it to the quarterfinals. This year, he said, he’d like to go further, but he is just happy for the experience.

In Japan, a panel will evaluate Ramberg and Brockmann to determine if the men can advance to third-degree black belts.

That guidepost would reaffirm why Brockmann says he loves the sport.

"If I’ve had a really good day, it’s fun to go and be with my friends," he said. "If I’ve had a really bad day, by the end of karate class, I forget my day."

Highlights from Grand Opening in Historic Downtown Longmont

Japanese Consul and Taiko Drummers highlights of Shudokan Karate grand opening in Longmont - Longmont Examiner

When Japanese Consul Kazuaki Kubo was asked to say a few words to the large group of people attending the recent grand opening of the new location of Shudokan Karate in Longmont, he gushed words of praise as to the new location of the school and the view of the Rocky Mountains he saw as he made his way to it from his Denver office.

It was a fitting tribute to this Longmont business who's name "Shudokan" literally means "the house where you master the way. " There are only twenty schools in the world which carry the Shudokan designation.... Read the full article »